JB’S JOURNAL FOR AUTHORS

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YOU CAN’T EDIT YOUR OWN BOOK

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JB’s Journal for Authors is a bi-weekly newsletter dedicated to the author who never has enough time and is crushed by information. The journal highlights important information to help authors sell books.

Photos: Pixabay

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2016-05-17 12.40.16

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EDITOR’S COMMENT ON BLOG MAILING LIST 

Please send me an email if you want to add your name to our mailing list. In appreciation, a courtesy download of SETH will be made available in either epub for your reader or as a pdf file. Just indicate which you would prefer. Thank you.

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HEADLINE

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MAILCHIMP ALTERNATIVES FOR AUTHORS by Ricardo Fayet from Jane Friedman

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EDITOR’ S COMMENT: Most authors are familiar with MailChimp, the market leader in mailing list services. Ricardo discusses the pros and cons of the industry leader along with its two principal competitors, MailerLite and ConvertKit. The success of JB’s JOURNAL FOR AUTHORS is pushing me to a mailing service provider. I recommend the post to anyone in a similar situation.

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FEATURED ARTICLE

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AN ACQUISITION EDITORS SHARES THREE QUICK TIPS FOR CREATING A STRONG VOICE by Kat Brzozowski from The Write Conversation

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EDITOR’S COMMENT: JB’S JOURNAL has highlighted many articles on POV and its importance. I will continue to focus on the issue. The three points covered are a bit different and worthy of consideration. There is value that Kat is an editor. Each tip is equal in weight to help authors’ with POV struggles.

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FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

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THE HARD FACTS ON HARDCOVER BOOKS by Kathy Rowe and K.S. Brooks from Indies Unlimited

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EDITOR’S COMMENT: Bit out of my pay grade,  but what we have here is a thorough discussion on hardcover book opportunities for the indie writers. The two authors focused on six manufacturers of covers and the costs involved to snag a hardcover. What I liked was the comprehensive approach to the subject. I am confident few questions will remain at the conclusion of the post.

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DO YOU REALLY KNOW HOW TO “SHOW, DON’T TELL” by C. S. Lakin from Live Write Thrive

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EDITOR’S COMMENT: I declare, it is an editor’s persistent comment. “Show rather than tell.” Enough to drive an author nuts in frustration. I like the comparison between the written scene and the visual scene in a Hollywood movie. An author has greater opportunities for success breaking the scene down into a series of “camera shots”. Well worth the read, and I am confident it will help.

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YOU CAN’T EDIT YOUR OWN BOOK AND HERE ARE SEVEN REASONS WHY by Blake Atwood from The Write Life

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EDITOR’S COMMENT: Authors have argued their own editing efforts usurp the need for a professional edit. Blake tells it straight without a waste of words. Authors are too emotionally connected, confident, insecure and lack the expertise to skip an outside edit. The post is a case of tough love.

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BONUS

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HOW TO CREATE MOOD LIKE EDGAR ALLAN POE by Kathy Edens from PROWritingAid

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EDITOR’S COMMENT: A quick read and interesting. Kathy points out Edgar Allen Poe used two techniques to ensure success in his writing. He wrote in the first person and used the five senses. Worth a read if the mood is in the center ring of the story.

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FIVE WAYS TO CREATE STRONG INTERNAL CONFLICT by Janice Hardy from Live Write Thrive

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HOW TO CREAT MEANINGFUL OBSTACLES VIA CONFLICT by Janice Hardy from Live Write Thrive

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EDITOR’S COMMENT:  The two articles blend together well to explain the need for conflict and why it is important to help ensure a successful story. Simply put, a conflict is a circumstance that challenges the MC physically, mentally or emotionally.  Janice explains,”Stuff happening does not equal meaningful conflict.”. She adds five techniques to develop internal conflict.

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WEAVING BACKSTORY INTO FRONTSTORY  by James Scott Bell from Writer Unboxed

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EDITOR’S COMMENT:  An outstanding author is a juggler balancing the needs for backstory into an unobtrusive insert into the front story. James explains dialogue is a successful medium to add the necessary information. What I like about the post was the use of examples to help authors wrestle with this perennial challenge. Short, sweet, and to the point.

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EDITING YOUR BOOK PART TWO – DEVELOPMENTAL EDITING: THE FIFTY-THOUSAND-FOOT VIEW BY Sarah Sally Hamer from The Write Conversation

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EDITOR’S COMMENT: This is the second in a series on editing. Developmental editing is an essential tool and can be used before or after the book is finished. Sarah identifies the seven elements of developmental editing.

 

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SECOND PAGE

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EVERYTHING WE’VE EVER PUBLISHED ABOUT GETTING PAID TO WRITE by the TWL Team from The Write Life

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GRAMMAR SHORTS: MAKE YOUR WRITING BETTER USING THESE THREE SUGGESTIONS by Jayne Bodell from Two Drops of Ink

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THE POINT OF VIEW TAPESTRY by John Gilstrap from the Kill Zone Blog

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WHEN TO USE COMMAS BEFORE QUOTATIONS by Samantha Enslen, read by Mignon Fogarty from Grammar Girl

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"You are only here once. Make it count. Touch the lives of others." -JB Morris